sabato 27 agosto 2016

PRE+CH1 Mindset: Changing The Way You think To Fulfil Your Potential by Carol Dweck

Mindset: Changing The Way You think To Fulfil Your Potential by Carol Dweck
You have 140 highlighted passages
You have 138 notes
Last annotated on August 27, 2016
INTRODUCTIONRead more at location 81
Note: INTRO@@@@@@@@@@@ Edit
My work is part of a tradition in psychology that shows the power of people’s beliefs.Read more at location 83
Note: POTERE ALLA CREDENZA Edit
In this book, you’ll learn how a simple belief about yourself—a belief we discovered in our research—guides a large part of your life.Read more at location 86
Note: GUIDA Edit
Chapter 1 THE MINDSETSRead more at location 112
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I expected differences among children in how they coped with the difficulty, but I saw something I never expected. Confronted with the hard puzzles, one ten-year-old boy pulled up his chair, rubbed his hands together, smacked his lips, and cried out, “I love a challenge!” Another, sweating away on these puzzles, looked up with a pleased expression and said with authority, “You know, I was hoping this would be informative!”Read more at location 117
Note: RISPETTO LA DIFFICOLTÀ Edit
They knew that human qualities, such as intellectual skills, could be cultivated through effort.Read more at location 125
Note: SFORZO Edit
I, on the other hand, thought human qualities were carved in stone. You were smart or you weren’t, and failure meant you weren’t. It was that simple.Read more at location 127
Note: SCOLPITE Edit
Whether human qualities are things that can be cultivated or things that are carved in stone is an old issue. What these beliefs mean for you is a new one:Read more at location 129
Note: DUE PROBLEMI DISTINTI Edit
WHY DO PEOPLE DIFFER?Read more at location 133
Note: TITOLO Edit
Experts lined up on both sides. Some claimed that there was a strong physical basis for these differences, making them unavoidable and unalterable.Read more at location 135
Note: PERCHÈ LE PERSONE SONO DIFFERENTI? Edit
Others pointed to the strong differences in people’s backgrounds, experiences, training, or ways of learning. It may surprise you to know that a big champion of this view was Alfred Binet, the inventor of the IQ test.Read more at location 138
Note: EDUCAZXIONE Edit
Today most experts agree that it’s not either–or. It’s not nature or nurture, genes or environment. From conception on, there’s a constant give and take between the two. In fact, as Gilbert Gottlieb, an eminent neuroscientist, put it, not only do genes and environment cooperate as we develop, but genes require input from the environment to work properly.Read more at location 148
Note: OR OR ET ET Edit
Robert Sternberg, the present-day guru of intelligence, writes that the major factor in whether people achieve expertise “is not some fixed prior ability, but purposeful engagement.”Read more at location 153
Note: MOTIVAZUIONE Edit
WHAT DOES ALL THIS MEAN FOR YOU? THE TWO MINDSETSRead more at location 156
Note: TITOLO Edit
Believing that your qualities are carved in stone—the fixed mindset—creates an urgency to prove yourself over and over.Read more at location 160
Note: METTERSI ALLA PROVA Edit
Some of us are trained in this mindset from an early age. Even as a child, I was focused on being smart, but the fixed mindset was really stamped in by Mrs. Wilson, my sixth-grade teacher. Unlike Alfred Binet, she believed that people’s IQ scores told the whole story of who they were. We were seated around the room in IQ order, and only the highest-IQ students could be trusted to carry the flag,Read more at location 163
Note: MAESTRA WILSON Edit
Who cared about or enjoyed learning when our whole being was at stake every time she gave us a test or called on us in class?Read more at location 167
Note: MOTIVAZIONE ZERO Edit
Every situation calls for a confirmation of their intelligence, personality, or character. Every situation is evaluated: Will I succeed or fail? Will I look smart or dumb? Will I be accepted or rejected?Read more at location 169
Note: L OSESSIONE Edit
In this mindset, the hand you’re dealt is just the starting point for development. This growth mindsetRead more at location 174
Note: L ESITO È SOLO L INIZIO Edit
Did you know that Darwin and Tolstoy were considered ordinary children? That Ben Hogan, one of the greatest golfers of all time, was completely uncoordinated and graceless as a child? That the photographer Cindy Sherman, who has been on virtually every list of the most important artists of the twentieth century, failed her first photography course? That Geraldine Page, one of our greatest actresses, was advised to give it up for lack of talent?Read more at location 179
Note: FALLENTI Edit
A VIEW FROM THE TWO MINDSETSRead more at location 187
Note: TITOLO Edit
In other words, they’d see what happened as a direct measure of their competence and worth.Read more at location 195
Note: FIXED MINDSET Edit
Are these just people with low self-esteem? Or card-carrying pessimists? No. When they aren’t coping with failure, they feel just as worthy and optimistic—and bright and attractive—as people with the growth mindset.Read more at location 200
Note: OTTIMISTI SE IL CASO Edit
Yet those people with the growth mindset were not labeling themselves and throwing up their hands. Even though they felt distressed, they were ready to take the risks, confront the challenges, and keep working at them.Read more at location 217
Note: GROWING Edit
SO, WHAT’S NEW?Read more at location 219
Note: TITOLO Edit
What is truly amazing is that people with the fixed mindset would not agree. For them, it’s “Nothing ventured, nothing lost.” “If at first you don’t succeed, you probably don’t have the ability.” “If Rome wasn’t built in a day, maybe it wasn’t meant to be.”Read more at location 222
Note: FIXED Edit
it’s startling to see the degree to which people with the fixed mindset do not believe in effort.Read more at location 224
Note: SCETTICI SULLO SFORZO Edit
It’s not just that some people happen to recognize the value of challenging themselves and the importance of effort. Our research has shown that this comes directly from the growth mindset. When we teach people the growth mindset, with its focus on development, these ideas about challenge and effort follow. Similarly, it’s not just that some people happen to dislike challenge and effort. When we (temporarily) put people in a fixed mindset, with its focus on permanent traits, they quickly fear challenge and devalue effort.Read more at location 226
Note: LA CREDENZA È TUTTO Edit
We often see books with titles like The Ten Secrets of the World’s Most Successful People crowding the shelves of bookstores, and these books may give many useful tips. But they’re usually a list of unconnected pointers, like “Take more risks!” or “Believe in yourself!”Read more at location 230
Note: PUNTINI NN UNITI Edit
SELF-INSIGHT: WHO HAS ACCURATE VIEWS OF THEIR ASSETS AND LIMITATIONS?Read more at location 243
Note: TITOLO Edit
Well, maybe the people with the growth mindset don’t think they’re Einstein or Beethoven, but aren’t they more likely to have inflated views of their abilities and try for things they’re not capable of?Read more at location 244
Note: GM PRESUNTUOSI? Edit
But it was those with the fixed mindset who accounted for almost all the inaccuracy. The people with the growth mindset were amazingly accurate.Read more at location 247
Note: AL CONTRARIO Edit
Howard Gardner, in his book Extraordinary Minds, concluded that exceptional individuals have “a special talent for identifying their own strengths and weaknesses.”Read more at location 253
Note: TALENTO E LIMITE Edit
WHAT’S IN STORERead more at location 255
Note: TITOLO Edit
The other thing exceptional people seem to have is a special talent for converting life’s setbacks into future successes. Creativity researchers concur. In a poll of 143 creativity researchers, there was wide agreement about the number one ingredient in creative achievement. And it was exactly the kind of perseverance and resilience produced by the growth mindset.Read more at location 256
Note: RESILIENZA Edit
Grow Your MindsetRead more at location 263
Note: TITOLO Edit